THIS BROKEN WONDROUS WORLD on the Barnes and Noble “40 YA Books You Need On Your Summer Reading List”

I’m in amazing company for August, with David Levithan, Libba Bray, and a bunch of others!

Check it out:

This Broken Wondrous World, by Jon Skovron
Why we’re excited: In a world in which monsters exist, the once human-avoiding son of Frankenstein’s Monster and his Bride is now living with Dr. Frankenstein’s descendants. Then a flareup of monstrous activity prefaces a strange invitation to join forces with the disturbed and disturbing Dr. Moreau, whose nefarious plans for world domination force Boy to become a man.
Pair with: Monster movie marathon

See the complete list here.

40 YA Books You Need On Your Summer Reading List

I’m in amazing company for August, with David Levithan, Libba Bray, and a bunch of others on this B&N list!

Check it out:

This Broken Wondrous World, by Jon Skovron
Why we’re excited: In a world in which monsters exist, the once human-avoiding son of Frankenstein’s Monster and his Bride is now living with Dr. Frankenstein’s descendants. Then a flareup of monstrous activity prefaces a strange invitation to join forces with the disturbed and disturbing Dr. Moreau, whose nefarious plans for world domination force Boy to become a man.
Pair with: Monster movie marathon

School Library Review for This Broken Wondrous World

Here is another great review! This one from School Library Journal:

Boy is the teenage son of Frankenstein’s Monster and the Bride. Yes, his name is just that, Boy. He has spent his entire life living in hiding with other monsters, including vampires, goblins, trolls, dryads, mermaids, and more. In this sequel to Man Made Boy (Viking, 2013), Boy has overcome his fear of humans and ventures to Switzerland to visit the descendants of Dr. Frankenstein. During his visit, Boy becomes embroiled in a conflict that threatens all of humankind. A mysterious doctor attempts to recruit Boy and his fellow monsters to join an army that will overthrow the humans. The protagonist quickly learns that this doctor has been creating disturbing monsters in a lab and that he is willing destroy anything that gets in the way of total monster domination. This work crisscrosses many different genres: fantasy, science fiction, horror, and humor. The plot is fast paced and filled with action, keeping readers engaged. At times, it can be difficult to keep track of all the various characters and their locations, especially for those unfamiliar with the previous volume. However, it can still be enjoyed as a stand-alone title. This book is best suited for older teens due to some mild adult content and some frightening scenes. VERDICT Fans of science fiction and humor will enjoy this clever, monster-filled read.

This Broken Wondrous World is out Aug 4th. Preorder now!

Great review for This Broken Wondrous World on VOYA

The Voice of Youth Advocates (VOYA) magazine has a really great review of Broken Wondrous World:

This sequel to Man Made Boy (Viking, 2013/VOYA August 2014) is set in an alternate present where, unbeknownst to humans, monsters are real. Boy, the son of Frankenstein’s monster and the Bride of Frankenstein, must find a way to save monsters and humanity when both existences are threatened by the evil Dr. Moreau and his army of human–animal hybrids and monster followers who demand equality at any cost. In the action-packed story, Boy rejoins old friends—a werewolf and vampire from the New York City theater troupe; his split-personality Jekyll/Hyde girlfriend; Vi, a virtual intelligence that he created; and two new allies, Henri, a descendant of Dr. Frankenstein, and La Perricholi, a Peruvian vigilante, in order to prove that not all monsters are evil.

Boy is an endearing character who continually fights for what he thinks is right. Despite being forced into hiding because he is different, Boy still believes that monsters and humans can coexist peacefully. Skovron draws upon mythology and classic literature to create an enjoyable story with memorable characters. Cursing is used sparingly, and while it is referred to that Boy and his girlfriend have sex, it is never written about directly, making this appropriate for young teens. Enough backstory is given so that new readers will be able to jump right into the series. Recommend this to fans of Rick Riordan’s Percy Jackson and the Olympians and Bill Willingham’s Fables series or anyone looking for a fun story with heart.—Marissa Wolf.

I’m in great company, there!

This Broken Wondrous World will be out August 4th. If you preorder now, it really helps out with the sales and marketing stuff.

Lovely Review for This Broken Wondrous World in Kirkus

I’ve been in crazy deadline mode for…a while? I think? What month is it?

Anyway, the Kirkus review is awesome and the last line cracked me up (it’s probably funnier once you’ve read the book. which you will, right? because, I mean, you’ll love it. honestly. unless you don’t like monsters, Swiss graphic designers, or Peruvian assassins, ). So here it the review in its entirety:

Advanced technology, experimental science, inspired revolution in the name of unity: sometimes they work, sometimes they don’t. In the time since Boy’s own technological catastrophe nearly outed his monster clan in Man Made Boy (2013), he has left his gritty, familiar home in Manhattan to study at university in Geneva. He’s living on the estate of Dr. Frankenstein, whose descendants consider Boy family, particularly “cousin” and fellow freshman Henri. Boy hasn’t quite settled in when a disappearing dwarf delivers a foreboding message, a carnivorous mermaid tries to eat him, and girlfriend Sophie Jekyll/Claire Hyde arrives with news that her brother Robert Jekyll is up to no good. Boy returns with Henri and Sophie/Claire to New York, where they learn that Robert has joined forces with Dr. Moreau. Cue: disturbing, warped plans of global domination. Characters from the first book join appealing newcomers, but with the high stakes of a monster revolution, the demises of some favorites are inevitable. There is still a fair amount of red-blooded monster boy behavior, but it isn’t all sex, booze, and bloody battles. Affection, sorrow, guilt, anger, and particularly integrity are addressed; paraphrasing Claire, we’re all capable of terrible things, but it’s integrity that separates those who do and don’t succumb. An enjoyably action-laden, sometimes bloody, globe-trotting lesson in what it means to be monster, to be man, and to be careful when serving dryads alcohol. (Science fiction. 12 & up)

Yay!

And now, back to the deadline cave. Tick tock. Less than a week before the new project is due. Eep!